2021 Media Watch Archives

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Wonderful Engineering

This New Extended-Range NFC Fabric Will Allow Clothes to Talk To Each Other

Wonderful Engineering -
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have created a novel, high-tech sort of material that foreshadows a future in which clothing gadgets may “talk” to one other and purchases can be made with a high-five or a wave of the arm. … “You’ve used near-field signaling applied sciences if you’ve held your smartphone or credit card near a reader to pay for a purchase order,” says co-author Peter Tseng [assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science]. “Our materials work on the same principle, but we’ve broadened the range dramatically.” This means that you may keep your phone in your pocket and transfer energy and data to and from your device just by brushing your body against different textiles or readers.” Read More
Orange County Register

Climate change could fuel bigger summer waves in Southern California

The Orange County Register -
“All these other things play a role, but waves are one of the most important causes of coastal erosion and flooding,” said Brett Sanders, an engineering professor who leads a UC Irvine team in coastal flooding and erosion hazards research. … “You could reach the point where the beaches don’t have a chance to recover,” said Sanders, who oversees the Metropolitan Beaches Projects online at sites.uci.edu/beaches. [Subscription required, campus-wide access provided by UCI Libraries. Sign-up here: https://guides.lib.uci.edu/news/ocregister] Read More
KTLA 5

UC Irvine engineers create high-tech fabric that lets wearers pay for purchases with a high-five

KTLA5 -
“If you’ve held your smartphone or charge card close to a reader to pay for a purchase, you have taken advantage of near-field signaling technologies. Our fabrics work on the same principle, but we’ve extended the range significantly,” said Peter Tseng, UCI assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science. “This means you could potentially keep your phone in your pocket, and just by brushing your body against other textiles or readers, power and information can be transferred to and from your device.” Read More
New Atlas

Extended-range NFC fabric lets clothes "talk" to each other

New Atlas -
“If you’ve held your smartphone or charge card close to a reader to pay for a purchase, you have taken advantage of near-field signaling technologies," explains co-author Peter Tseng, [UCI assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science]. "Our fabrics work on the same principle ….” … “With our fabric, electronics establish signaling as soon as you hover your clothes over a wireless reader, so you can share information with a simple high-five or handshake,” says lead author Amirhossein Hajiaghajani. “You would no longer need to manually unlock your car with a key or separate wireless device, and your body would become the badge to open facility gates.” Read More
Armenian Weekly

A Female Engineer in Armenia

Armenian Weekly -
The first thing [Knar Baghdassarian] did this year after graduating from the University of California Irvine with a Bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering was head straight to Armenia to participate in the AYF Internship in Armenia program. “I chose my field of study knowing that I would one day use my education to contribute to the advancement of Armenia’s scientific and technological sectors.” Read More
Popular Science

Heavy rains in drought-stricken states could be dangerous

Popular Science -
Amir AghaKouchak, UCI professor of civil & environmental engineering and Earth system science writes, “I study cascading hazards like this, in which consecutive events lead to human disasters. Studies show climate change is raising the risk of multiple compound disasters, and it’s clear that communities and government agencies aren’t prepared. … With compound and cascading events likely to become more common in a warming world, being able to prepare for and manage multiple hazards will be increasingly essential.” Read More
Yahoo News

Extreme rain heads for California’s burn scars, raising the risk of mudslides – this is what cascading climate disasters look like

Yahoo News (The Conversation) -
Amir AghaKouchak, UCI professor of civil & environmental engineering and Earth system science writes, “I study cascading hazards like this, in which consecutive events lead to human disasters. Studies show climate change is raising the risk of multiple compound disasters, and it’s clear that communities and government agencies aren’t prepared. … With compound and cascading events likely to become more common in a warming world, being able to prepare for and manage multiple hazards will be increasingly essential.” Read More
Orange County Register

Help wanted: More sand for south Orange County’s shrinking beaches

Orange County Register -
UC Irvine Civil and Environmental Engineering professor Brett Sanders said coastal communities are thinking more about new ways to keep sand on the beaches, an important buffer between waves and infrastructure. … As a region, we’ve prioritized development over shoreline protection. One of the consequences of how we’ve developed land and drainage systems, we no longer transport sand to the coast the way it once was.” Coastal towns should also be working together to find solutions, Sanders said. [Subscription required, campus-wide access provided by UCI Libraries. Sign-up here: https://guides.lib.uci.edu/news/ocregister] Read More
ITS International

Velodyne tech to improve UCI traffic

ITS International -
Velodyne Lidar solution is to be equipped at 25 intersections as part of a University of California Irvine (UCI) study to improve traffic and road safety. The Horiba Institute for Mobility and Connectivity2 (HIMaC2) in the UCI Samueli School of Engineering will install Velodyne's Intelligent Infrastructure Solution at intersections in the University and the adjacent city of Irvine. The solution combines Velodyne’s Lidar sensors with artificial intelligence (AI) software to monitor traffic networks and public spaces. Read More
Slate

What Is “Clean Hydrogen”?

Slate -
Jack Brouwer, director of the Advanced Power and Energy Program at the University of California, Irvine, where he conducts research on a broad range of hydrogen applications, told Grist that commercially available power plant technology can currently burn a blend of up to 30 percent hydrogen gas and 70 percent methane. … For Brouwer, blending green hydrogen into the natural gas system, whether for power plants or homes, is still very much worth doing — not so much for the greenhouse gas benefits, but to create a new market for solar and wind power. Read More

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