Media Watch

The Athletic

The ball is different again, and it’s changing the way pitches move. Now what?

The Athletic -
Now there’s new research from Glenn Healey and Lequan Wang in the electrical engineering and computer science departments at the University of California, Irvine which shows that as the seam height changes, the movement on pitches changes. By using optical and radar tracking, and correcting for weather effects, Healey and Wang were able to graph the movement of pitches by season in major league baseball. … Healey’s new study has the benefit of over 700,000 pitches of TrackMan data behind it. [Subscription required, you can request an electronic copy of the article by sending an email to communications@uci.edu.] Read More
SC Magazine

Is the electric grid closer to a devastating cyberattack that could mean lights out?

SC Magazine -
And then there’s the evidence presented … by researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) that a spoofing mechanism tucked into a disposable coffee cup could generate a 32 percent change in output voltage, a 200 percent increase in low-frequency harmonics power and a 250 percent boost in real power from a solar inverter. “Without touching the solar inverter, without even getting close to it, I can just place a coffee cup nearby and then leave and go anywhere in the world, from which I can destabilize the grid,” said Mohammad Al Faruque’s research group in UCI’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering. Read More
Chemistry World

Microscopy reveals mantis shrimp’s shock-absorbing secrets

Chemistry World -
A team led by University of California, Irvine, materials scientist David Kisailus has analyzed the impact-resistant coating on the shrimp’s dactyl club. Using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy the researchers made a 3D map of the club’s surface layer. … The researchers say that the particulate layer’s combination of stiffness and shock-absorbing properties outperform many artificial materials and could provide inspiration for new lightweight protective coatings with potential uses in construction, vehicles and body armor. Read More
GEN

Low-cost, rapid COVID-19 testing platform could be available across U.S. by year end

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News -
University of California, Irvine (UCI) scientists say a robust, low-cost imaging platform, utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology, and costing just a couple of hundred dollars, may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the United States by the end of the year. Using blood from a finger prick, the UCI test probes hundreds of antibody responses to 14 respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. Results are available in two to four hours. Read More
Help Net Security

Disrupting a power grid with cheap equipment hidden in a coffee cup

Help Net Security -
Mohammad Al Faruque, UCI associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and his team revealed that the spoofing mechanism can generate a 32 percent change in output voltage … “Without touching the solar inverter, without even getting close to it, I can just place a coffee cup nearby and then leave and go anywhere in the world, from which I can destabilize the grid,” Al Faruque said. “In an extreme case, I can even create a blackout.” Read More
News Medical Life Sciences

Lab-on-a-chip technology detects COVID-19 antibody

News Medical Life Sciences -
A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology created by University of California, Irvine scientists may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year. … UCI investigators Weian Zhao, Per Niklas Hedde, Enrico Gratton and Philip Felgner believe that their new technology can help accelerate the testing process quickly and affordably. Read More
PhysOrg

Research team develops low-cost, accurate COVID-19 antibody detection platform

Phys.org -
A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology created by University of California, Irvine scientists may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year. … UCI investigators Weian Zhao, Per Niklas Hedde, Enrico Gratton and Philip Felgner believe that their new technology can help accelerate the testing process quickly and affordably. Read More
LEED Points

UCI researchers hacked solar inverters using just $50 worth of equipment

LEED Points -
Cyber-physical systems security researchers at the University of California, Irvine can disrupt the functioning of a power grid using about $50 worth of equipment tucked inside a disposable coffee cup. In a presentation delivered at the recent Usenix Security 2020 conference, Mohammad Al Faruque, UCI associate professor of electrical engineering & computer science, and his team revealed that the spoofing mechanism can generate a 32 percent change in output voltage, a 200 percent increase in low-frequency harmonics power and a 250 percent boost in real power from a solar inverter. Al Faruque’s group in UCI’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering have made a habit in recent years of finding exploitable loopholes in systems that combine computer hardware and software with machines and other infrastructure. Read More
The Engineer

Microscopy adds to understanding mantis shrimp strength

The Engineer -
Now, University of California, Irvine materials science researchers discovered that the clubs have a uniquely designed nanoparticle coating that absorbs and dissipates energy. …  “Think about punching a wall a couple thousand times at those speeds and not breaking your fist,” said David Kisailus, UCI professor of materials science & engineering. Read More
Aviation Analysis

Dactyl Clubs of mantis shrimp could be the clue to make a lot more resilient surfaces

Aviation Analysis -
The UCI scientists have discovered out that the clubs comprise a nanoparticle coating that absorbs and disperses the vitality. … “Consider about punching a wall a few thousand situations at people speeds and not breaking your fist. Which is fairly impressive, and it bought us pondering about how this could be,” says David Kisailus, Professor of Supplies Science and Engineering, University of California, Irvine. Read More

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