Media Watch Archives

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Salon

Extreme Flooding from Florence Likely, Due to Convergence of Threats

Salon -
“We have ignored it in the past, we cannot ignore it in the future,” says Amir AghaKouchak, a civil engineer at the University of California, Irvine …. AghaKouchak is studying how sea level rise might affect such flooding; a 2017 study he co-authored found that when compound flooding and sea level rise were factored in, the chances of floods that exceed what local infrastructure was built to accommodate went up considerably.
Science Friday

Water, Water, Everywhere

Science Friday -
As Hurricane Florence nears land, one engineer notes the rising risk of a flooding double whammy as sea levels rise and the climate changes. Guest: Amir AghaKouchak, associate professor of civil engineering at the University of California, Irvine.
Scientific American

Extreme Flooding from Florence Likely, Due to Convergence of Threats

Scientific American -
“We have ignored it in the past, we cannot ignore it in the future,” says Amir AghaKouchak, a civil engineer at the University of California, Irvine …. AghaKouchak is studying how sea level rise might affect such flooding; a 2017 study he co-authored found that when compound flooding and sea level rise were factored in, the chances of floods that exceed what local infrastructure was built to accommodate went up considerably.
Venture Beat

PerceptIn’s Self-driving Vehicles Go on Sale in November for $40,000

Venture Beats -
While autonomous cars aren’t as expensive as they used to be, they’re not exactly competitive with midrange family sedans. … Dr. Shaoshan Liu says it doesn’t have to be that way. The University of California Irvine graduate … is the founder and CEO of PerceptIn, a robotics startup headquartered in Santa Clara, California that’s been developing an in-house self-driving car platform since 2016. It today unveiled the DragonFly Pod, an autonomous vehicle priced at just $40,000 that’ll go on sale in November.
EOS

We Can Work It Out: Avoiding Disasters

Eos -
Amir AghaKouchak, [associate professor] University of California, Irvine; and Ben van der Pluijm, write, “The key question is, What does it take to prevent natural hazards from becoming human disasters? … This leads to another important question: How can the scientific community inform societies about critical thresholds and strengthen their resilience against natural hazards?”
The Guardian

'Apocalyptic threat': dire climate report raises fears for California's future

The Guardian -
The “apocalyptic threat” the governor described would present itself in myriad ways in a state prone to extreme weather events like drought and wildfires, said Amir AghaKouchak, an associate professor at the University of California, Irvine, and a researcher who contributed to the assessment.
The New Zealand Herald

Australia Battling the Big Dry

The New Zealand Herald -
Wild animals moving closer to human populations is a common side effect of drought, Amir AghaKouchak, a civil and environmental engineering professor at the University of California at Irvine, told the Washington Post. "It happens all the time - in Australia with kangaroos, and in some other countries, even cheetahs and jaguars get closer to farms when there's a lack of water," he said.
The Washington Post

In Australia, Farmers Dealing with Drought Can Kill Kangaroos that Compete with Their Livestock

The Washington Post -
Wild animals moving closer to human populations is a common side effect of drought, Amir AghaKouchak, a civil and environmental engineering professor at the University of California at Irvine, told The Washington Post. “It happens all the time — in Australia with kangaroos, and in some other countries, even cheetahs and jaguars get closer to farms when there’s a lack of water,” he said.
Circa

Trump's Water Policy Tweets Spur Debate, Confusion Amid Record Wildfires

Circa -
Amir AghaKouchak, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Irvine, recently co-authored a study in “Science Advances” showing that regions facing drought conditions have warmed four times faster than parts of the country with average weather conditions. That combined effect of heat waves and droughts is contributing to an uptick in the severity of wildfires in California. “Fires are getting more frequent, more intense,” he said. “Not only that, the fire season is changing.”
International Environmental Technology

Are Droughts Getting Hotter?

International Environmental Technology -
A new study from the University of California Irvine (UCI) has found that temperatures are increasing during droughts in large parts of the United States. The researchers analysed temperature and precipitation records from the 20th and 21st century and found that the mercury was rising at a faster rate in areas affected by drought than other more moderate climates.

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