Media Watch Archives

2017 | 2016 | 2015
The Sacramento Bee

UC grad students drive innovation, merit state aid

The Sacramento Bee -
On Wednesday, I’m taking a break my from chemical engineering research to join other UC graduate students in Sacramento. Our message to lawmakers: Graduate students are the engines that drive California innovation – think Tesla, but a whole lot cheaper.
Wired.co.uk

Spies can steal objects by recording the sound of a 3D printer

Wired.co.uk -
Industrial spies could accurately 'steal' 3D objects by recording the sound of them being produced on a 3D printer. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, have demonstrated a method by which a 3D design could be reverse-engineered by analysing the vibrations picked up from a common 3D printer.
Gizmodo

A Smartphone Can Copy a 3D Model By Just Recording the Sounds of a 3D Printer

Gizmodo -
The team of researchers at UCI's Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, led by Mohammad Al Faruque, were able to recreate a 3D-printed key-shaped object with 90 percent accuracy using the sound copying and processing technique they developed.
Techworm

3D printing technology is vulnerable to hacking say researchers

Techworm -
The team, led by Mohammad Al Faruque, director of UCI's Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, showed that a device as ordinary and ubiquitous as a smartphone can be placed next to a machine and capture acoustic signals that carry information about the precise movements of the printer’s nozzle. The recording can then be used to reverse engineer the object being printed and re-create it elsewhere. Detailed processes may be decoded through this new kind of cyberattack, presenting important security risks.
Gizmodo UK

Spies Can Tell What a 3D Printer is Making by Listening to it

Gizmodo UK -
Mohammad Al Faruque of the Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems lab. "According to the fundamental laws of physics, energy is not consumed; it's converted from one form to another -- electromagnetic to kinetic, for example. Some forms of energy are translated in meaningful and useful ways; others become emissions, which may unintentionally disclose secret information," he explained, in a complicated way of saying making stuff = sound clues. Like, you could fake a chair by listening to the chipping sounds of a carpenter.
Maine News Online

Possibility of 3D Design Imitation through Printer Sounds

Maine News Online -
A team of researchers, headed by Mohammad Al Faruque at the University of California in Irvine, displayed the possibility of rebuilding a 3D model on the basis of the audio of the printer, while in operation. The position and movements of a 3D printer’s extruder can be determined through the sounds made by it during work. 
Gizmag

Eavesdropping on 3D printers allows reverse engineering of sensitive designs

Gizmag -
Led by Mohammad Al Faruque, director of the Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems lab, the team found that placing a smartphone alongside the machine as it printed objects layer-by-layer enabled them to capture the acoustic signals. It says that these recordings contain information about the precise movement of the nozzle, and that information can later be used to reverse engineer the item being printed.
CNET

Your 3D printer is telling people what it's making

CNET -
In research demonstrating that industrial espionage may be as simple as opening a recording app on your smartphone, a team led by Professor Mohammad Al Faruque at the University of California at Irvine has shown that it is possible to reconstruct a 3D model based solely on audio of the printer in action.
The Engineer

Sound used to map 3D-printing process

Your 3D printer is telling people what it's making CNET - ‎12 hours ago‎ In research demonstrating that industrial espionage may be as simple as opening a recording app on your smartphone, a team led by Professor Mohammad Al Faruque at the University of -
“In many manufacturing plants, people who work on a shift basis don’t get monitored for their smartphones, for example,” said Mohammad Al Faruque, director of UCI’s Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab. “If process and product information is stolen during the prototyping phases, companies stand to incur large financial losses. There’s no way to protect these systems from such an attack today, but possibly there will be in the future.”
3DPrint.com

Can the Sound of a 3D Printer Be a Security Threat? Researchers at the University of California Think So

3DPrint.com -
The research team, led by Mohammad Al Faruque, an electrical engineer, computer scientist and director of UCI's Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, discovered – almost by accident – that it is possible for an ordinary smartphone to record the very precise sounds made by a 3D printer during operation. While this may seem innocuous and even pointless, unless you’re trying to create a very avant-garde musical composition, those sounds carry very specific information about the printer’s movements. By analyzing the recording, a would-be hacker can actually reverse engineer the object being printed and then recreate it somewhere else.

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