Media Watch

CNN

Why it's so hard to give up ridesharing

CNN -
Ride-hailing is not only for the young. An analysis of data from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey found that highly educated, affluent seniors in urban areas were among those who were more likely to be adopters of ride-hailing services. Often, these adults must give up their licenses, especially if they have a medical condition, said Suman Kumar Mitra, an assistant project scientist at the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Irvine. … Safety is a concern for this population, too, he said. But he surmises that the benefits of the services outweigh the safety concerns. "It gives them the freedom to go anywhere any place at any time," he said.
Futurism

New “Metallic Wood” Could Lead to Super-Light Cars

Futurism -
Timothy J. Rupert, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at University of California, Irvine, who wasn’t involved in the research, also sees potential uses for the metallic wood in transportation. “One could imagine making a car with the same safety standards used today but a much, much lighter weight,” Rupert told The Philadelphia Inquirer. “This would have huge implications for energy efficiency.”
Sleep Review

UCI Engineers Aim to Pioneer Tissue-engineering Approach to TMJ Disorders

Sleep Review -
“The TMJ is central to chewing, talking, and so many other daily activities, so when this crucial joint is impaired, there are significant negative effects on quality of life,” says Kyriacos A. Athanasiou, distinguished professor of biomedical engineering at the University of California, Irvine, in a release. “The problem may start with slight pain and clicking and get progressively worse to the point where it’s not just impacting the jaw but the entire body.”
Dentistry Today

UCI Now Developing Bioengineered TMJ Implants

Dentistry Today -
Noting that synthetic materials and other approaches have proved ineffective, researchers at the University of California Irvine (UCI) are developing biological temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs that will be suitable for implantation in human beings. “The TMJ is central to chewing, talking, and so many other daily activities. So when this crucial joint is impaired, there are significant negative effects on quality of life,” said Kyriacos A. Athanasiou, PhD, PhM, MS, distinguished professor of biomedical engineering.
USA Today

The waters are rising, the floods are coming. What are we doing to save ourselves?

USA Today -
At the University of California, Irvine, environmental engineering professor Brett Sanders and his team are building computer models that show both historic flooding and areas at risk because of climate change, to give residents access to as much information as is available. He hopes to make the program more widely available as they get more funding.
engineering.com

Researchers Predict Machine Sounds Could Potentially Pose a Threat to Biosecurity

Engineering.com -
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine and University of California, Riverside recently presented a paper at the Network and Distributed System Security Symposium highlighting the potential threat of the sounds emitted by lab instruments and machines. To address rising biosecurity concerns, the group devised a machine-learning algorithm that can successfully reconstruct what a lab instrument was used for through sound recordings.
Homeland Security News Wire

A new world for hackers: Acoustic side-channel attack

Homeland Security News Wire -
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine and the University of California, Riverside have uncovered the possibility of an acoustic side-channel attack on the DNA synthesis process, a vulnerability that could present a serious risk to biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. … “A few years ago, we published a study on a similar method for stealing blueprints of objects being fabricated in 3-D printers, but this attack on DNA synthesizers is potentially much more serious,” said Mohammad Al Faruque, UC Irvine associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science.
STRN

Machines Whisper Our Secrets

STRN -
Brisk and UC Irvine electrical and computer engineering professor Mohammad Abdullah Al Faruqueand his doctoral student Sina Faezi; along with John C. Chaput, a professor of pharmaceutical sciences at UC Irvine; and William Grover, a bioengineering professor at UC Riverside, set microphones similar to those in a smartphone in several spots near a DNA synthesizer in Chaput’s lab.
IEEE Spectrum

How to Steal DNA With Sound

IEEE Spectrum -
Engineers at the University of California say they have demonstrated how easy it would be to snoop on biotech companies making synthetic DNA…. The researchers demonstrated their spying technique on the Applied Biosystems 3400 DNA Synthesizer, a widely used older model…. “Acoustics for this particular machine was the problem,” says Mohammad Al Faruque, an electrical and computer engineering professor at the University of California Irvine whose team developed the algorithms. But any type of emission from a machine can potentially be analyzed, he says.
The New York TImes

Is the Next Hacking Frontier Being Developed in California?

The New York Times -
The idea for the project, said Mohammad Al Faruque, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at U.C.I., stemmed from his previous work stealing blueprints for things printed by a 3-D printer. “If you can eavesdrop on a machine, you can understand what it’s making,” he said. “And with the 3-D printer, we demonstrated that.”

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