Media Watch

Arizona Public Media

Study: Droughts Are Growing Hotter Under Climate Change

Arizona Public Media -
"We've observed a shift of approximately 0.6 degrees Celsius [1.0 Fahrenheit] between the first and the second half of the 20th century. But if you only include months classified as dry, you see that there's almost double the shift in temperature," said lead author Felicia Chiang, a graduate student researcher in civil and environmental engineering at UC Irvine.
Los Angeles Times

A Vicious Climate Cycle: Droughts are Becoming Hotter, Raising Risk of Wildfire, Scientists Say

Los Angeles Times -
A team from UC Irvine that compared temperature changes across the U.S. found that temperatures rise faster in places under drought conditions than they do in places with average climates. This relationship could also raise the risk of concurrent heatwaves and wildfires, the researchers say.
KJZZ 91.5

Study: Droughts Are Growing Hotter Under Climate Change

KJZZ 91.5 -
Now, scientists at University of California, Irvine have found that areas experiencing dry conditions are heating up faster than the rest of the country. "We've observed a shift of approximately 0.6 degrees Celsius [1.0 Fahrenheit] between the first and the second half of the 20th century. But if you only include months classified as dry, you see that there's almost double the shift in temperature," said lead author Felicia Chiang, a graduate student researcher in civil and environmental engineering at UC Irvine.
Michigan Radio

Study: Droughts and heat waves happening at the same time

Michigan Radio -
Felicia Chiang is the lead author of a new study on droughts and climate change, from the University of California-Irvine. “Essentially we found that droughts are warming faster than the average climate in the southern, the midwestern and the northeastern states of the U.S.,” she says.
Quartz

Scientists say a new climate trend makes perfect wildfire conditions more common

Quartz -
Amir AghaKouchak, a University of California-Irvine professor who co-authored the study, warned that the upward trend in the number and intensity of wildfires will likely continue, due to a combination of worsening climate change and population growth.
KPCC

Cranston Fire updates, monsoons in the desert, a three-course meal cooked in your car

KPCC - Take Two -
(Starts at 20:34)
Despite an essential relief of the dry conditions, the intense rains will also mean localized flooding, mudslides and dust storms in some areas. The Inland Empire saw three to five inches of intense rain and thunderstorms in the midst of extreme heatwaves hitting the Southwest. So what are the causes and science behind these supposed anomalies? Guest: Kimberly Duong, climate researcher at UC Irvine

Speed thrills: Germans dominate Hyperloop Pod Competition at Hawthorne’s SpaceX for second year in a row

Orange County Register -
Miles Richman, a mechanical engineering student competing with the HyperXite team from University of California at Irvine, said just being a part of the event was a great experience – even though the pod did not make it to the final round. “It’s great to see everyone come together and work on a common goal of trying to build the next form of transportation,” Richman said. “It’s really cool.”

Hyperloop U: At SpaceX, Elon Musk’s high-tech transportation competition may be launching loads of careers

Orange County Register -
“Every engineering student should do a project like this,” said Adora Tadros, an engineering student from UC Irvine working with about 60 teammates on the HyperXite team. … “What we’re doing is really pushing ourselves,” Tadros said. “To be as competitive as we are just proves how much you can accomplish when you organize and set your minds to something.”
Outside Logo

This Patch of Water Can Predict Southwest Drought

Outside -
When the study’s lead author, Antonios Mamalakis, a graduate student in civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Irvine, looked at data collected for the past 40 years, he found the [New Zealand Index] to be about 85 percent consistent in predicting precipitation. “This is the most important practical finding of our work,” Mamalakis says.
Lab Manager Magazine

Grand Opening for UC Irvine Materials Research Institute and JEOL Center for NanoScale Solutions

Lab Manager -
During the opening ceremonies, Professor [Xioaqing] Pan said, “Our mission is to build UCI into a world-renowned institution in materials research. We aim to provide an innovative environment for future talent by offering state-of-the-art tools for solving today’s challenges. Furthermore, as an interdisciplinary institute, IMRI provides a perfect platform for the collaboration of researchers in different fields. It will not only lead to the discovery of chemical bonds between elements, it will also create bonds between people.”

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