2019 Media Watch Archives

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Interesting Engineering

5G Has Already Usurped 6G and It's Not Even Here Yet

Interesting Engineering -
"We call our chip 'beyond 5G' because the combined speed and data rate that we can achieve is two orders of magnitude higher than the capability of the new wireless standard," said senior author Payam Heydari, NCIC Labs director and UCI professor of electrical engineering & computer science. "In addition, operating in a higher frequency means that you and I and everyone else can be given a bigger chunk of the bandwidth offered by carriers."
Tech Startups

Latest tech news and top tech stories

Tech Startups -
Engineers at the University of California, Irvine have invented an end-to-end transmitter-receiver silicon chip that is capable of processing digital signals with significantly greater speed and energy efficiency because of its unique digital-analog architecture. The new wireless transceiver boosts radio frequencies into 100-gigahertz territory, quadruple the speed of the upcoming 5G, or fifth-generation, wireless communications standard.
Venture Beat

Researchers create tiny ‘beyond 5G’ chip for 100GHz data transmission

Venture Beat -
“We call our chip ‘beyond 5G’ because the combined speed and data rate that we can achieve is two orders of magnitude higher than the capability of the new wireless standard,” explained UCI electrical engineering and computer science professor Payam Heydari. “[O]perating in a higher frequency means that you and I and everyone else can be given a bigger chunk of the bandwidth offered by carriers.” Hossein Mohammadnezhad, lead author of the academic paper announcing the project, says that the “new transceiver is the first to provide end-to-end capabilities in this part of the spectrum.”
MIT Management

Ethics and automation: What to do when workers are displaced

MIT -
Pramod Khargonekar, vice chancellor for research at University of California, Irvine, and Meera Sampath, associate vice chancellor for research at the State University of New York, presented findings from their paper, “Socially Responsible Automation: A Framework for Shaping the Future.” The research makes the case that “humans will and should remain critical and central to the workplace of the future, controlling, complementing and augmenting the strengths of technological solutions.”
Today

Devices that emit piercing, high-pitched sounds installed at parks to stop teen loitering

Today -
"These devices have been banned in some municipalities in Europe," Dr. Hamid Djalilian, professor of otolaryngology and biomedical engineering and director of otology and neurotology at the University of California, Irvine told TODAY. "The main issue is that children who are young and can't express themselves could be hearing the sound," Djalilian said, citing children with autism as a group who could be affected.
SF Gate

How octopus could help us to keep, or lose, our cool

SF Gate -
[Alon] Gorodetsky’s lab at the University of California at Irvine (UCI) has been trying to make what he calls “technologically valuable things” based on cephalopods’ camouflaging skills. They’ve finally succeeded in creating a material that will let people, not disguise themselves as rocks and algae, but regulate how warm or cool they feel. … “There’s a world of applications for this material,” Gorodetsky says. “We just have to convince people to wear it and use it.”
Long Beach Business Journal

BizBrief: Today’s News To Know

Long Beach Business Journal -
Cynthia Guidry, who most recently served as deputy executive director of Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA), was today announced as the new director of the Long Beach Airport. … She holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of California, Irvine and a master’s in business administration from Pepperdine University.
Sierra Club

Study: Transitioning California Off Gas Could Lower Costs and Prioritize Low-Income Communities

Sierra Club -
Last week, the California Energy Commission hosted a workshop to dig into Energy and Environmental Economics (E3) and UC Irvine’s latest “Future of Gas” study, which analyzes pathways to a low-carbon buildings sector.
Neuroscience News

Nanotechnology treatment reverses multiple sclerosis in mice

Neuroscience News -
A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. “Until now, stem cell therapies for autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases have produced mixed results in clinical trials, partly because we don’t know how the treatments work,” said corresponding author Weian Zhao, an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences and biomedical engineering who is affiliated with the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center.
Physics Today

Q&A: Kandice Tanner on applying physics to cancer research

Physics Today -
My adviser had two labs. One was in photon migration, where I was for my PhD research. The other was using fluorescence dynamics to look at processes in living cells …. People came from all over the world to learn fluorescence techniques from him, and I thought it would be stupid not to learn from him while I was there. He moved to the University of California, Irvine, and I moved with him to do a postdoc. I immersed myself in a different type of imaging.

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