Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Computer Engineering

The concentration in Computer Engineering provides students with a solid base in the design, development, and evaluation of computer systems. Thrust areas include computer architecture, software, and embedded systems, but the program is highly customizable to the specific interests of the student. The research activities of the faculty in this concentration include parallel and distributed computer systems, distributed software architectures and databases, ultra-reliable real-time computer systems, VLSI architectures, reconfigurable computing, computer design automation, low-power design, embedded systems, computer communication protocols, computer networks, security, programming languages for parallel/distributed processing, knowledge management, service-oriented architectures, and software engineering.

Two plans are offered for the M.S. degree: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option. For either option, students are required to develop a complete program of study with advice from their faculty advisor. The graduate advisor must approve the study plan. Part-time study toward the M.S. degree is available. The program of study must be completed within four calendar years from first enrollment.
 

Plan I: Thesis Option

  • The thesis option requires completion of:
    • 12 courses of study
    • An original research investigation
    • Completion of an M.S. thesis
    • Approval of the thesis by a thesis committee
  • The thesis committee is composed of three full-time faculty members with the faculty advisor of the student serving as the chair
  • Required undergraduate core courses and graduate seminar courses may not be counted toward the 12 courses:
    • EECS290
    • EECS292
    • EECS293
    • EECS294
    • EECS295
  • Three core courses in the Computer Engineering concentration (CpE) must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better
  • At least 4 additional concentration or approved courses must also be completed with a B (3.0) or better
  • No more than four units of EECS299 and one undergraduate elective course may be counted toward the 12 courses
  • Up to four (16 units) of the required 12 courses may be from EECS296 (M.S. Thesis Research) with the approval of the student's thesis advisor
  • No more than 1 undergraduate elective course may be counted


Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Option

  • The comprehensive examination option requires the completion of 12 courses and a comprehensive examination
  • Three core courses in the Computer Engineering concentration (CpE) must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better
  • At least five additional concentration or approved courses must also be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better
  • Only one EECS299 course can be counted if the EECS299 course is four or more units
  • Undergraduate core courses and graduate seminar courses may not be counted toward the 12 courses requirements: 
    • EECS290
    • EECS292
    • EECS293
    • EECS294
    • EECS295
  • In fulfillment of the comprehensive examination seminar element of the M.S. degree program, students are required to enroll and complete EECS 294 in one quarter.
  • No more than two undergraduate elective courses may be counted
  • Additional concentration-specific requirements are as follows; a list of core and concentration courses is given at the end of this section

M.S. Plan of Study

 

List of CE Concentration Courses

  • EECS210
  • EECS211*
  • EECS213*
  • EECS215*
  • EECS217
  • EECS219
  • EECS221
  • EECS222
  • EECS223
  • EECS225
  • EECS226
  • EECS227
  • EECS228**
  • EECS230
  • EECS248A
  • Computer Science 233
  • Computer Science 234
  • Computer Science 236

Courses denoted with * are also core courses

Course denoted ** requires student to submit a Genreal Petition to count this course as a concentration

NOTE: Students who entered prior to fall of 2012 should follow the course requirements outlined within the Catalogue of the year they entered. The change in number of units per course is not intended to change the course requirements for the degree nor to have any impact in the number of courses students are taking. As such, students will need to continue to meet the same high standards and plan of study requirements as previously required. Students will work with their advisor to create a plan of study encompassing the equivalent topical requirements, as well as the equivalent number of courses to the previous 36-unit requirement.

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements outlined above, it is a University requirement for the Master of Science degree that students fulfill a minimum of 36 units of study.