Media Watch

America's Greatest Makers

Kimberly and Nicole - Slapband (Video)

America’s Greatest Makers -
University of California, Irvine biomedical engineering students Nicole Mendoza and Kimberly Veliz are featured on America's Greatest Makers. "We are both first generation college students ... and we are biomedical engineers at the University of California, Irvine ... we are passionate about finding solutions to medical problems. ... So we made the slapband. ... The future of medicine is not in curing all disease but preventing it in the first place. The slapband will be a tool that can help prevent heart disease."
Los Angeles Times

3-D printers' sounds hold secrets that can be stolen, UCI researchers find

Los Angeles Times -
"The key is small, but the implication is huge," said Mohammad Al Faruque, director of UCI's Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab. "It means that valuable processing information can be lost" to hackers who, for example, might capture audio from the printing process to make parts for cars and planes.
Gizmag

Nanopillared surface inspired by insect wings counteracts bacteria

Gizmag -
"Other research groups have also created antibacterial nanopillar surfaces, but none of their approaches can be used on ordinary polymer surfaces or be scaled up easily," says Albert F. Yee, professor of chemical engineering and materials science at the University of California, Irvine.
The Sacramento Bee

UC grad students drive innovation, merit state aid

The Sacramento Bee -
On Wednesday, I’m taking a break my from chemical engineering research to join other UC graduate students in Sacramento. Our message to lawmakers: Graduate students are the engines that drive California innovation – think Tesla, but a whole lot cheaper.
Futurism

Acoustic Thievery: Researchers Find a Way to “Hack” 3-D Printers Using Sound

Futurism -
Mohammad Al Faruque, the director of UCI’s Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, led the team which showed that a simple device, such as a smartphone, can capture acoustic signals that carry information about the precise movements of the printer’s nozzle. These recordings can then be used to reverse engineer whatever object is being printed and re-create it somewhere else. Basically, this poses a huge security risk due to how easily detailed and confidential processes can be deciphered using common, everyday gadgets.
Wired.co.uk

Spies can steal objects by recording the sound of a 3D printer

Wired.co.uk -
Industrial spies could accurately 'steal' 3D objects by recording the sound of them being produced on a 3D printer. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, have demonstrated a method by which a 3D design could be reverse-engineered by analysing the vibrations picked up from a common 3D printer.
Gizmodo

A Smartphone Can Copy a 3D Model By Just Recording the Sounds of a 3D Printer

Gizmodo -
The team of researchers at UCI's Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, led by Mohammad Al Faruque, were able to recreate a 3D-printed key-shaped object with 90 percent accuracy using the sound copying and processing technique they developed.
Techworm

3D printing technology is vulnerable to hacking say researchers

Techworm -
The team, led by Mohammad Al Faruque, director of UCI's Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, showed that a device as ordinary and ubiquitous as a smartphone can be placed next to a machine and capture acoustic signals that carry information about the precise movements of the printer’s nozzle. The recording can then be used to reverse engineer the object being printed and re-create it elsewhere. Detailed processes may be decoded through this new kind of cyberattack, presenting important security risks.
Gizmodo UK

Spies Can Tell What a 3D Printer is Making by Listening to it

Gizmodo UK -
Mohammad Al Faruque of the Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems lab. "According to the fundamental laws of physics, energy is not consumed; it's converted from one form to another -- electromagnetic to kinetic, for example. Some forms of energy are translated in meaningful and useful ways; others become emissions, which may unintentionally disclose secret information," he explained, in a complicated way of saying making stuff = sound clues. Like, you could fake a chair by listening to the chipping sounds of a carpenter.
Maine News Online

Possibility of 3D Design Imitation through Printer Sounds

Maine News Online -
A team of researchers, headed by Mohammad Al Faruque at the University of California in Irvine, displayed the possibility of rebuilding a 3D model on the basis of the audio of the printer, while in operation. The position and movements of a 3D printer’s extruder can be determined through the sounds made by it during work. 

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